Possible Futures for Artificial Intelligence in Law Practice

As the legal marketplace continues to see significant economic and productivity gains from many practice-specific technologies, is it possible that attorneys themselves could one day be supplanted by sophisticated systems driven by artificial intelligence (AI) such as IBM’s Watson?

Jeopardy championships aside for the moment, leading legal technology expert and blogger Ron Friedmann has posted a fascinating report and analysis on August 24, 2014 on his Prism Legal Strategic Technology Blog entitled Meet Your New Lawyer, IBM Watson. He covers an invitation-only session held for CIO’s of large global law firms held at this summer’s annual meeting held by International Legal Technology Association (ILTA) where a Watson senor manager made a presentation to this group. Ron, as he always does on his consistently excellent blog, offers his own deep and valuable insights on the practical and economic implications regarding the possible adaptation of Watson to the work done at large law firms. I highly recommend clicking-through and full read of this post.

(X-ref also to an earlier post here ILTA’s New Multi-dimensional Report on the Future of Legal Information Technology.)

As I was preparing to write this post a few days ago, lo and behold, my September 2014 subscription edition of WIRED arrived. It carries a highly relevant feature about a hush-hush AI startup, entitled Siri’s Inventors Are Building a Radical New AI That Does Anything You Ask, by Steven Levy. This is about the work of the founders of Viv Labs who are developing the next generation of AI technology. Even in a crowded field where many others have competed, the article indicates that this new company may really be onto something very new. That is, AI as a form of utility that can:

  • Access and integrate vast numbers of big data sources
  • Continually teach itself to do new things and autonomously generate supporting code to accomplish them
  • Handle voice queries on mobile devices that involve compound and multi-level questions,steps and sources to resolve

Please check out the full text of this article for all of the details about how Viv’s technology works and its exciting prospective uses.

That said, would Viv’s utility architecture as opposed to Watson’s larger scale technology be more conducive to today’s legal applications? Assuming for the moment that it’s technically feasible, how would the ability to operate by such voice-based AI input/output affect the operation and quality of results for, say, legal research services, document assembly applications, precedent libraries, enterprise search, wikis, extranets, and perhaps even Continuing Legal Education courses? What might be a tipping point towards a greater engagement of AI in the law across many types of practices and office settings? Might this result in in-house counsel bringing more work to their own staffs rather than going to outside counsel? Would public interest law offices be able to provide more economical services to clients who cannot normal afford to pay legal fees? Might this have further impacts upon the trends towards fixed fee-based billing arrangements?

5 thoughts on “Possible Futures for Artificial Intelligence in Law Practice

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  4. Pingback: New Startup’s Legal Research App is Driven by Watson’s AI Technology |

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