New Startups, Hacks and Conferences Focused Upon Health Data and Analytics

The intersection of digital technology, the Web and modern medicine seems to produce new innovative approaches to health care on a very steady basis. Three reports have appeared within the past ten days that I believe typify the imagination and dedication of the companies and individuals in this space. While the following articles barely scratch the surface, they nonetheless provide an informative sampling of some very interesting trends that likely would not have been possible until quite recently.

1. User Survey Data Mined to Provide Consumer Information on Prescription Drugs: A new company called Iodine has created a database based built upon 100,000+ surveys provided taken from people who have been prescribed medicines. Visitors to the site can use it to look up the consensus findings about the effectiveness, potential side effects, warnings, pricing and other practical information about a vast number of drugs. (Of course, consulting first with your doctor about them is always of primary importance.)

The full details of the Iodine’s origin, current operations*, investor support, use of Google Consumer Surveys and other data sources, and its potential benefits to patients and the pharmaceutical industry was the subject of a very engaging article published in the September 23, 2014 edition of The New York Times entitled To Gather Drug Data, a Health Start-Up Turns to Consumers by Steve Lohr. (See also another brief article entitled Iodine: A Platform to Help You Choose the Best Medicines for You by Ben Woods, posted on TheNextWeb.com on September 24, 2014.) I also highly recommend a click-through to Iodine’s site to view and test out their new approach to producing and presenting this specialized consumer information.

2. Hackers Modifying Medical Devices: A group of engineers have joined forces online to provide a useful hack to the continuous glucose monitor produced by a company called Dexcom. As reported in an article entitled Hackers Tinker With Medical Devices in the September 27, 2014 edition of The Wall Street Journal, by Kate Linebaugh (a subscription to WSJ.com is required for access), this hack is called NightScout. To briefly sum up this story, NightScout enables data from this device to be uploaded online to permit parents and other concerned individuals to remotely check the blood glucose levels of family members and friends who have Type 1 diabetes, from their smartphones. The Dexcom monitor currently on the market does not do this, although such a connection is planned for a subsequent release possibly next year.

The monitor itself consists of two parts: A small plastic pod which is worn by person with diabetes that transmits the blood glucose readings on a continuous basis to a handheld device within a 20-foot radius (which is nearly the same dimensions of a typical smartphone). This system is used to look for and alert the user to certain helpful patterns in the changes to their blood glucose levels and to record this data. In turn, the data is also quite helpful to the person’s medical providers.

This is indeed a very data-driven approach to treating Type 1 diabetes, which has always required close monitoring by the patient in an effort to maintain normal blood glucose levels. Doing so helps to avoid long-term complication and maintain good health.

Neither the manufacturer nor the FDA has approved NightScout, but they have not tried to stop it. Rather, they are closely watching its ongoing improvements by the NightScout online community and how this is affecting the quality of care for the users.

3. Industry Conference Presentation on Data-Driven Medical Technologies: An article entitled Can a Computer Replace Your Doctor? by Elizabeth Rosenthal in the September 20, 2014 edition of The New York Times, reported on other advances and growing interest by doctors driven by big data collection and analytics. These developments were the subject of a presentation called Health By Numbers at the recent 2014 Health Innovation Summit in San Francisco. This article opens with an account of a doctor asking his audience whether they would prefer an AI to an actual doctor.**

To briefly summarize this story, some of these systems and methodologies discussed, among others:

  • An iPhone app to diagnose ear infections
  • Home kits to check cholesterol levels
  • The above mentioned blood glucose monitoring devices
  • Wearable fitness trackers

Moreover, the attendees discussed many key issues about pursuing these lines of medical treatment and administration including high expectations and mixed outcomes, challenges in quantifying exactly what “health” means, that sometimes good data does not always equal a healthy patient, and how to most meaningfully process and analyze all of the available data. I highly recommend a click-through and full read of this very informative and thought-provoking piece.

My follow up questions concerning all three of these stories include:

  • Will the privacy patient and user data be adequately protected by current laws or do the rapid emergence and adaptation of these systems require new legislation and regulation to ensure patient privacy?
  • Whether and how the roles of doctors and other medical service personnel will be changed? If so, how will their academic training need to be revised?
  • What, if any, will be the impact on the costs, quality, policies and politics of medical care in the US and elsewhere?

____________________________
*   No stitches were involved as these concern business, not surgery.

** Compare and contrast to this September 1, 2014 post here entitled Possible Futures for Artificial Intelligence in Law Practice.

3 thoughts on “New Startups, Hacks and Conferences Focused Upon Health Data and Analytics

  1. Pingback: Startup is Visualizing and Interpreting Massive Quantities of Daily Online News Content |

  2. Pingback: Companies Are Forming Digital Advisory Panels To Help Keep Pace With Trending Technologies |

  3. Pingback: Medical Researchers are Developing a “Smart Insulin Patch” |

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s