Mapping the Distribution of Mobile Device Operating Systems in New York

“Busy Times Square”, Image by Jim Larrison

Scott Galloway, a Clinical Professor of Marketing at NYU Stern School of Business, consultant and entrepreneur, recently gave a remarkable and captivating 15-minute presentation at this year’s Digital Life Design 15 (DLD15) Conference. This event was held in Munich on January 18 through 20, 2015. He examined the four most dominant global companies in the digital world and predicted those among them whose market values might  rise or fall. These included Amazon, Google, Apple and Facebook. Combined, their current market value is more than $1 trillion (yes, that’s trillion with a “t“).

The content and delivery of Professor’s Galloway’s talk is something that I think you will not soon forget. Whether his insights are in whole or in part correct, his talk will motivate you to think about  these four companies who, individually and as a group, exert such monumental economic, technical, commercial, and cultural influence across the entirety of the web. I highly recommend that you click-through and fully view this video.

Towards the end of his presentation, Professor Galloway clicked onto a rather astonishing slide of a heat map of New York City encoded with data points indicating mobile devices using Apple’s IoS, Android or Blackberry operating systems. This particular part of the presentation was covered in a most interesting article entitled Fun Maps: Heat Map of Mobile Operating Systems in NYC by Michelle Young on UntappedCities.com on March 31, 2015. The article adds three very informative additional graphics individually illuminated the spread of each OS. I will briefly recap this report, provide some links and annotations, and add a few comments of my own.

Professor Galloway interprets the results as indicating a correlation between each OS and the relative wealth of different neighborhoods in NYC: IoS devices are more prevalent in areas of higher incomes while Android appears more concentrated in lower income areas and suburbia.

However, Ms. Young believes this mapping is “misleading” and cites another article on UntappedCities.com entitled Beautiful Maps and the Lies They Tell, posted on February 20, 2014. This carefully refuted a series of data-mapped visualizations that were first published and interpreted as showing that only wealthier people used fitness apps.

Furthermore, there have been a series of Twitter posts in response to this heat map stating that the colors used for the heat map (red for IoS, green for Android and purple for Blackberry), might be misleading due to some optical blurring in the colors and geotagged tweets from 2011 to 2013. (X-ref to the March 20, 2015 Subway Fold post entitled Studies Link Social Media Data with Personality and Health Indicators, for other examples of geotagging.) In effect, there may be a structural bias whereby “If Twitter users tend to be on Apple products”.

The data and heat maps notwithstanding, as a New York City native and life-long resident, my own completely unscientific observations tell me that IoS and Android are more evenly split both in terms of absolute numbers and any correlation to the relative wealth of any given neighbor hood. The most obvious thing that jumped out at me was that each day millions of people commute all around the city, mostly into and around Manhattan. However,  this does not seem to have been taken into account. Thus, while User X’s mobile device may show him or her in a wealthier area of Manhattan, he or she might well live in, and commute from, another more working class neighborhood from a considerable distance away.

Rather than using such static heat maps, I would propose that a time-series of readings and data be taken continuously over a week or so. Next, I suggest applying some customized algorithms and analytics to smooth out, normalize and intuit the data. My instincts tell me that the results would indicate a much more homogenous mix of mobile OSes across all or most of the neighborhoods here.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s