Artificial Swarm Intelligence: There Will be An Answer, Let it Bee

Honey Bee on Willow Catkin", Image by Bob Peterson

“Honey Bee on Willow Catkin”, Image by Bob Peterson

In almost any field involving new trends and developments, anything attracting rapidly increasing media attention is often referred to in terms of “generating a lot of buzz”. Well, here’s a quite different sort of story that adds a whole new meaning to this notion.

A truly fascinating post appeared on TechRepublic.com this week on January 22, 2016 entitled How ‘Artificial Swarm Intelligence’ Uses People to Make Smarter Predictions Than Experts by Hope Reese. It is about a development where technology and humanity intersect in a highly specialized manner to produce a new means to improve predictions by groups of people. I highly recommend reading it in its entirety. I will summarize and annotate it, and then pose a few of my own bug-free questions.

A New Prediction Platform

In a recent switching of roles, while artificial intelligence (AI) concerns itself with machines executing human tasks¹, a newly developed and highly accurate algorithm “harnesses the power” of crowds to generate predictions of “real world events”. This approach is called “artificial swarm intelligence“.

A new software platform called UNU has being developed by a startup called Unanimous AI. The firm’s CEO is Dr. Louis Rosenberg. UNU facilitates the gathering of people online in order to “make collective decisions”. This is being done, according to Dr. Rosenberg “to amplify human intelligence”. Thus far, the platform has been “remarkably accurate” in its predictions of the Academy Awards, the Super Bowl² and elections.

UNU is predicated upon the concept of the wisdom of the crowds which states that larger groups of people make better decisions collectively than even the single smartest person within that group.³  Dr. Roman Yampolskiy, the Director of the Cybersecurity Lab at the University of Louisville, has also created a comparable algorithm known as “Wisdom of Artificial Crowds“. (The first time this phenomenon was covered on The Subway Fold, in the context of entertainment, was in the December 10, 2014 post entitled Is Big Data Calling and Calculating the Tune in Today’s Global Music Market?)

The Birds and the Bees

Swarm intelligence learns from events and systems occurring in nature such as the formation of swarms by bees and flocks by birds. These groups collectively make better choices than their single members. Dr. Rosenberg believes that, in his view there is “a vast amount of intelligence in groups” that, in turn generates “intelligence that amplifies their natural abilities”. He has transposed the rules of these natural systems onto the predictive abilities of humans in groups.

He cites honeybees as being “remarkable” decision-makers in their environment. On a yearly basis, the divide their colonies and “send out scout bees” by the hundreds for many miles around to check out locations for a new home. When these scouts return to the main hive they perform a “waggle dance” to “convey information to the group” and next decide about the intended location. For the entire colony, this is a “complex decision” composed of “conflicting variables”. On average, bee colonies choose the optimal location by more than 80%.

Facilitating Human Bee-hive-ior

However, humans display a much lesser accuracy rate when making their own predictions. Most commonly, polling and voting is used. Dr. Rosenberg finds such methods “primitive” and often incorrect as they tend to be “polarizing”. In effect, they make it difficult to assess the “best answer for the group”.

UNU is his firm’s attempt to facilitate humans with making the best decisions for an entire group. Users log onto it and respond to questions with a series of possible choices displayed. It was modeled upon such behavior occurring in nature among “bees, fish and birds”. This is distinguished from individuals just casting a single vote. Here are two videos of the system in action involving choosing the most competitive Republican presidential candidate and selecting the most beloved sidekick from Star Wars4. As groups of users make their selections on UNU and are influenced by the visible onscreen behavior of others, this movement is the online manifestation of the group’s swarming activity.

Another instance of UNU’s effectiveness and accuracy involved 50 users trying to predict the winners of the Academy Awards. On an individual basis, they each averaged six out of 15 correct. This test swarm was able to get a significantly better nine out of the 15.  Beyond movies, the implications may be further significant if applied in areas such as strategic business decision-making.

My Questions

  • Does UNU lend itself to being turned into a scalable mobile app for much larger groups of users on a multitude of predictions? If so, should users be able to develop their own questions and choices for the swarm to decide? Should all predictions posed be open to all users?
  • Might UNU find some sort of application in guiding the decision process of juries while they are resolving a series of factual issues?
  • Could UNU be used to supplement reviews for books, movies, music and other forms of entertainment? Perhaps some form of “UNU Score” or “UNU Rating”?

 


1.  One of the leading proponents and developers of AI for many decades was MIT Professor Marvin Minsky who passed away on Sunday, January 24, 2016. Here is his obituary from the January 25, 2015 edition of The New York Times entitled Marvin Minsky, Pioneer in Artificial Intelligence, Dies at 88, by Glenn Rifkin.

2.  For an alternative report on whether the wisdom of the crowds appears to have little or no effect on the Super Bowl, one not involving UNU in any way, see an article in the January 28, 2016 edition of The New York Times entitled Super Bowl Challenges Wisdom of Crowds and Oddsmakers, by Victor Mather.

3.  An outstanding and comprehensive treatment of this phenomenon I highly recommend reading The Wisdom of the Crowds, by James Surowiecki (Doubleday, 2004).

4.  I would really enjoy seeing a mash-up of these two demos to see how the group would swarm among the Star Wars sidekicks to select which one of these science fiction characters might have the best chance to win the 2016 election.

Does 3D Printing Pose a Challenge to the Patent System?

"Quadrifolium 3D Print", Image by fdecomite

“Quadrifolium 3D Print”, Image by fdecomite

Whenever Captain Picard ordered up some of his favorite brew, “Earl Grey tea, hot”, from the Enterprise’s replicator, it materialized right there within seconds. What seemed like pure science fiction back when Star Trek: The Next Generation was first on the air (1987 – 1994), we know today to be a very real, innovative and thriving technology called 3D printing. So it seems that Jean-Luc literally and figuratively excelled at reading the tea leaves.

These five Subway Fold posts have recently covered just a small sampling of the multitude of applications this technology has found in both the arts and sciences. (See also #3dprinting for the very latest trends and developments.)

Let us then, well, “Engage!” a related legal issue about 3D printing: Does it violate US federal copyright law in certain circumstances? A fascinating analysis of this appeared in an article on posted January 6, 2016 on ScientificAmerican.com entitled How 3-D Printing Threatens Our Patent System by Timothy Holbrook. I highly recommend reading this in its entirety. I will summarize and annotate it, and then pose some of my own non-3D questions.

Easily Downloadable and Sharable Objects

Today, anyone using a range of relatively inexpensive consumer 3D printers and a Web connection can essentially “download a physical object”. All they need to do is access a computer-aided design (CAD) file online and run it on their computer connected to their 3D printer. The CAD file provides the highly detailed and technical instructions needed for the 3D printer to fabricate the item. As seen in the photo above, this technology has the versatility to produce some very complex and intricate designs, dimensions and textures.

Since the CAD files are digital, just like music and movie files, they can be freely shared online. This makes it likely that just as music and entertainment companies were threatened by file-sharing networks, so too is it possible that 3D printing will result in directly challenging the patent system. However, this current legal framework “is even more ill-equipped” to manage this threat. Consequently, 3D printing technology may well conflict with “a key component of our innovation system”.*

The US federal government (through the US Patent and Trademark office – USPTO), issues patents for inventions they determine are “nontrivial advances in state of the art”. These documents award their holders the exclusive right to commercialize, manufacture, use, sell or import the invention, while preventing other from doing so.

Infringements, Infringers and Economic Values

Nonetheless, if 3D printing enables parties other than the patent holder to “evade the patent”, its value and incentives are diminished. Once someone else employs a 3D printer to produce an object covered by a particular patent, they have infringed on the holder’s legal rights to their invention.

In order for the patent holder to bring a case against a possible infringer, they would need to have knowledge that someone else is actually doing this. Today this would be quite difficult because 3D printers are so readily available to consumers and businesses. Alternatively, the patent laws allow the patent holder to pursue an action against anyone facilitating the means to commit the infringement. This means that manufacturers, vendors and other suppliers of CAD and 3D technologies could be potential defendants.

US copyright laws likewise prohibit the “inducement of infringement”. For example, while Grokster did not actually produce the music on its file-sharing network, it did facilitate the easy exchange of pirated music files. The music industry sued them for this activity and their operations were eventually shut down. (See also this August 31, 2015 Subway Fold post entitled Book Review of “How Music Got Free” about a recent book covering the history and consequences of music file sharing.)

This approach could also possibly be applied to 3D printing but based instead upon the patent laws. However, a significant impediment of this requires “actual knowledge of the relevant patent”. While nearly everyone knows that music is copyrighted, everyone is not nearly as aware that devices are covered by patents. 3D printers alone are covered by numerous patents that infringers are highly unlikely to know about much less abide. Moreover, how could a potentially aggrieved patent holder know about all of the infringers and infringements, especially since files can be so easily distributed online?

The author of this piece, Timothy Holbrook, a law professor at Emory University School of Law, and Professor Lucas Osborn from Campbell University School of Law, believe that the courts should focus on the CAD files to stem this problem. They frame the issue such that if the infringing object can so easily be produced with 3D printing then “should the CAD files themselves be viewed as digital patent infringement, similar to copyright law?” Furthermore, the CAD files have their own value and, when they are sold and used to 3D print an item, then such seller is benefiting from the “economic value of the invention”. The professors also believe there is no infringement if a party merely possesses a CAD file and is not selling it.

Neither Congress nor the courts have indicated whether and how they might deal with these issues.

My Questions

  • Would blockchain technology’s online ledger system provide patent holders with adequate protection against infringement? Because of the economic value of CAD files, perhaps under such an arrangement could they be written to the blockchain and then have Bitcoin transferred to the patent holder every time the file is downloaded.  (See the August 21, 2015 Subway Fold post entitled Two Startups’ Note-Worthy Efforts to Adapt Blockchain Technology for the Music Industry which covered an innovative approach now being explored for copyrights and royalties in the music industry)
  • Would the digital watermarking of CAD files be a sufficient deterrent to protect against file-sharing and potentially infringing 3D printing?
  • What new opportunities might exist for entrepreneurs, developers and consultants to help inventors protect and monitor their patents with regard to 3D printing?
  • Might some inventors be willing to share the CAD files of their inventions on an open source basis online as an alternative that may improve their work while possibly avoiding any costly litigation?

 


These seven Subway Fold posts cover a series of other recent systems, developments and issues in intellectual property.


If this ends up in litigation, the lawyers will add an entirely new meaning to their object-ions.

New IBM Watson and Medtronic App Anticipates Low Blood Glucose Levels for People with Diabetes

"Glucose: Ball-and-Stick Model", Image by Siyavula Education

“Glucose: Ball-and-Stick Model”, Image by Siyavula Education

Can a new app jointly developed by IBM with its Watson AI technology in partnership with the medical device maker Medtronic provide a new form of  support for people with diabetes by safely avoiding low blood glucose (BG) levels (called hypoglycemia), in advance? If so, and assuming regulatory approval, this technology could potentially be a very significant boon to the care of this disease.

Basics of Managing Blood Glucose Levels

The daily management of diabetes involves a diverse mix of factors including, but not limited to, regulating insulin dosages, checking BG readings, measuring carbohydrate intakes at meals, gauging activity and exercise levels, and controlling stress levels. There is no perfect algorithm to do this as everyone with this medical condition is different from one another and their bodies react in individual ways in trying to balance all of this while striving to maintain healthy short and long-term control of BG levels.

Diabetes care today operates in a very data-driven environment. BG levels, expressed numerically, can be checked on hand-held meter and test strips using a single drop of blood or a continuous glucose monitoring system (CGM). The latter consists of a thumb drive-size sensor attached with temporary adhesive to the skin and a needle attached to this unit inserted just below the skin. This system provides patients with frequent real-time readings of their BG levels, and whether they are trending up or down, so they can adjust their medication accordingly. That is, for A grams of carbs and B amounts of physical activity and other contributing factors, C amount of insulin can be calculated and dispensed.

Insulin itself can be administered either manually by injection or by an insulin pump (also with a subcutaneously inserted needle). The later of these consists of two devices: The pump itself, a small enclosed device (about the size of a pager), with an infusion needle placed under the patient’s skin and a Bluetooth-enabled handheld device (that looks just like a smartphone), used to adjust the pump’s dosage and timing of insulin released. Some pump manufacturers are also bringing to market their latest generation of CGMs that integrate their data and command functions with their users’ smartphones.

(The links in the previous two paragraphs are to Wikipedia pages with detailed pages and photos on CGMs and insulin pumps. See also, this June 27, 2015 Subway Fold post entitled Medical Researchers are Developing a “Smart Insulin Patch” for another glucose sensing and insulin dispensing system under development.)

The trickiest part of all of these systems is maintaining levels of BG throughout each day that are within an acceptable range of values. High levels can result in a host of difficult symptoms. Hypoglycemic low levels, can quickly become serious, manifesting as dizziness, confusion and other symptoms, and can ultimately lead to unconsciousness in extreme cases if not treated immediately.

New App for Predicting and Preventing Low Blood Glucose Levels

Taking this challenge to an entirely new level, at last week’s annual Consumer Electronics Show (CES) held in Las Vegas, IBM and Medtronic jointly announced their new app to predict hypoglycemic events in advance. The app is built upon Watson’s significant strengths in artificial intelligence (AI) and machine learning to sift through and intuit patterns in large volumes of data, in this case generated from Medtronic’s user base for their CGMs and insulin pumps. This story was covered in a most interesting article posted in The Washington Post on January 6, 2016 entitled IBM Extends Health Care Bet With Under Armour, Medtronic by Jing Cao and Michelle Fay Cortez. I will summarize and annotate this report and then pose some of my own questions.

The announcement and demo of this new app on January 6, 2016 at CES showed the process by which a patient’s data can be collected from their Medtronic devices and then combined with additional information from their wearable activity trackers and food intake. Next, all of this information is processed through Watson in order to “provide feedback” for the patient to “manage their diabetes”.

Present and Future Plans for The App and This Approach

Making the announcement were Virginia Rometty, Chairman, President and CEO of IBM, and Omar Ishrak, Chairman and CEO of Medtronic. The introduction of this technology is expected in the summer of 2016. It still needs to be submitted to the US government’s regulatory review process.

Ms. Rometty said that the capability to predict low BG events, in some cases up to three hours before they occur, is a “breakthrough”. She described Watson as “cognitive computing”, using algorithms to generate “prescriptive and predictive analysis”. The company is currently making a major strategic move into finding and facilitating applications and partners for Watson in the health care industry. (The eight Subway Fold posts cover other various systems and developments using Watson.)

Hooman Hakami, Executive VP and President, of the Diabetes Group at Medtronic, described how his company is working to “anticipate” how the behavior of each person with Diabetes affects their blood glucose levels. With this information they can then “make choices to improve their health”. Here is the page from the company’s website about their partnership with IBM to work together on treating diabetes.

In the future, both companies are aiming to “give patients real-time information” on how their individual data is influencing their BG levels and “provide coaching” to assist them in making adjustments to keep their readings in a “healthy range”. In one scenario, patients might receive a text message that “they have an 85% chance of developing low blood sugar within an hour”. This will also include a recommendation to watch their readings and eat something to raise their BG back up to a safer level.

My Questions

  • Will this make patients more or less diligent in their daily care? Is there potential for patients to possibly assume less responsibility for their care if they sense that the management of their diabetes is running on a form of remote control? Alternatively, might this result in too much information for patients to manage?
  • What would be the possible results if this app is ever engineered to work in conjunction with the artificial pancreas project being led in by Ed Damiano and his group of developers in Boston?
  • If this app receives regulatory approval and gains wide acceptance among people with diabetes, what does this medical ecosystem look like in the future for patients, doctors, medical insurance providers, regulatory agencies, and medical system entrepreneurs? How might it positively or negatively affect the market for insulin pumps and CGMs?
  • Should IBM and Medtronic consider making their app available on and open-source basis to enable other individuals and groups of developers to improve it as well as develop additional new apps?
  • Whether and how will insurance policies for both patients and manufacturers, deal with any potential liability that may arise if the app causes some unforeseen adverse effects? Will medical insurance even cover, encourage or discourage the use of such an app?
  • Will the data generated by the app ever be used in any unforeseen ways that could affect patients’ privacy? Would patients using the new app have to relinquish all rights and interests to their own BG data?
  • What other medical conditions might benefit from a similar type of real-time data, feedback and recommendation system?

Charge of the Light Brigade: Faster and More Efficient New Chips Using Photons Instead of Electrons

"PACE - PEACE" Image by Etienne Valois

“PACE – PEACE” Image by Etienne Valois

Alfred, Lord Tennyson wrote his immortal classic poem, The Charge of the Light Brigade, in 1854. It was to honor the dead heroes of a doomed infantry charge at the Battle of Balaclava during the Crimean War. Moreover, it strikingly portrayed the horrors of war. In just six short verses, he created a monumental work that has endured ever since for 162 years.

The poem came to mind last week after reading two recent articles on seemingly disparate topics. The first was posted on The New Yorker’s website on December 30, 2015 entitled In Silicon Valley Now, It’s Almost Always Winner Takes All by Om Malik. This is highly insightful analysis of how and why tech giants such as Google in search, Facebook in social networking, and Uber in transportation, have come to dominate their markets. In essence, competition is a fierce and relentless battle in the global digital economy. The second was an article on CNET.com posted on December 23, 2015 entitled Chip Promises Faster Computing with Light, Not Electrical Wires by Stephan Shankland. I highly recommend reading both of them in their entirety.

Taken together, the homonym of “light” both in historical poetry and in tech, seems to tie these two posted pieces together insofar as contemporary competition in tech markets is often described in military terms and metaphors. Focusing on that second story here for purposes of this blog post, about a tantalizing advance in chip design and fabrication, will this survive as it moves forward into the brutal and relentlessly “winner takes all” marketplace? I will summarize and annotate this story, and pose some of my own, hopefully en-light-ening questions.

Forward, the Light Brigade

A team of researchers, all of whom are university professors, including Vladimir Stojanovic from the University of California at Berkeley who led the development, Krste Asanovic also from Berkeley, Rajeev Ram from MIT, and Milos Popovic from the University of Colorado at Boulder, have created a new type of processing chip “that transmits data with light”. As well, its architecture significantly increases processing speed while reducing power consumption.  A report on the team’s work was published in an article in the December 24, 2015 issue of Nature (subscription required) entitled Single-chip Microprocessor That Communicates Directly Using Light by Chen Sun, Mark T. Wade, Yunsup Lee, et al.

This approach, according to Wikipedia, of “using silicon as an optical medium”, is called silicon photonics. IBM (see this link) and Intel (see this link)  have likewise been involved in R&D in this field, but have yet to introduce anything ready for the market.

However, this team of university researchers believes their new approach might be introduced commercially within a year. While their efforts do not make chips run faster per se, the photonic elements “keep chips supplied with data” which avoids them having to lose time by idling. Thus, they can process data faster.

Currently (no pun intended), electrical signals traverse metal wiring across the world on computing and communications devices and networks. For data traveling greater national and international distances, the electronic signals are transposed into light and sent along on high-speed fiber-optic cables. Nonetheless, this approach “isn’t cheap”.

Half a League Onward

What the university researchers’ team has done is create chips with “photonic components” built into them. If they succeed in scaling-up and commercializing their creation, consumers will be likely the beneficiaries. These advantages will probably manifest themselves first when used in data centers that, in turn, could speed up:

  • Google searches
  • Facebook image recognition
  • Other “performance-intensive features not economical today”
  • Remove processing bottlenecks and conserve battery life in smartphones and other personal computing platforms

Professor Stojanovic believes that one of their largest challenges if is to make this technology affordable before it can be later implemented in consumer level computing and communications devices. He is sanguine that such economies of scale can be reached. He anticipates further applications of this technology to enable chips’ onboard processing and memory components to communicate directly with each other.

Additional integrations of silicon photonics might be seen in the lidar remote sensing systems for self-driving cars¹, as well as brain imaging² and environmental sensors. It also holds the potential to alter the traditional methods that computers are assembled. For example, the length of cables is limited to the extent that data can pass through them quickly and efficiently before needed amplification along the way. Optical links may permit data to be transferred significant further along network cabling. The research team’s “prototype used 10-meter optical links”, but Professor Stojanovic believes this could eventually be lengthened to a kilometer. This could potentially result in meaningful savings in energy, hardware and processing efficiency.

Two startups that are also presently working in the silicon photonics space include:

My Questions:

  • Might another one of silicon photonics’ virtues be that it is partially fabricated from more sustainable materials, primarily silicon derived from sand rather than various metals?
  • Could silicon photonics chips and architectures be a solution to the very significant computing needs of the virtual reality (VR) and augmented reality (AR) systems that will be coming onto the market in 2016? This issue was raised in a most interesting article posted on Bloomberg.com on December 30, 2015 entitled Few Computers Are Powerful Enough to Support Virtual Reality by Ian King. (See also these 13 Subway Fold posts on a range of VR and AR developments.)
  • What other new markets, technologies and opportunities for entrepreneurs and researchers might emerge if the university research team’s chips achieve their intended goals and succeed in making it to market?

 


1.  See these six Subway Fold posts for references to autonomous cars.

2.  See these four Subway Fold posts concerning certain developments in brain imaging technology.