Mary Meeker’s 2018 Massive Internet Trends Presentation

“Blue Marble – 2002”, Image by NASA Goddard Space Flight Center

Yesterday, on May 30, 2018, at the 2018 Code Conference being held this week in Rancho Palos Verdes, California, Mary Meeker, a world-renowned Internet expert and partner in the venture capital firm Kleiner Perkins, presented her seventeenth annual in-depth and highly analytical presentation on current Internet trends. It is an absolutely remarkable accomplishment that is highly respected throughout the global technology industry and economy. The video of her speech is available here on Recode.com.

Her 2018 Internet Trends presentation file is divided into a series of twelve main sections covering, among many other things: Internet user, usage and devices growth rates; online payment systems; content creation; voice interfaces’ significant potential;  user experiences; Amazon’s and Alibaba’s far-reaching effects; data collection, regulation and privacy concerns; tech company trends and investment analyses; e-commerce sectors, consumers experiences and emerging trends;  social media’s breadth, revenue streams and influences; the grown and returns of online advertising; changes in consumer spending patterns and online pricing; key transportation, healthcare and demographic patterns;  disruptions in how, where and whether we work; increasingly sophisticated data gathering, analytics and optimization; AI trends, capabilities and market drivers; lifelong learning for the workforce; many robust online markets in China for, among many, online retail, mobile media and entertainment services; and a macro analysis of the US economy and online marketplaces.

That is just the tip of the tip of the iceberg in this 294-slide deck.

Ms. Meeker’s assessments and predictions here form an extraordinarily comprehensive and insightful piece of work. There is much here for anyone and everyone to learn and consider in the current and trending states nearly anything and everything online. Moreover, there are likely many potential opportunities for new and established businesses, as well as other institutions, within this file.

I very highly recommend that you set aside some time to thoroughly read through and fully immerse your thoughts in Ms. Meeker’s entire presentation. You will be richly rewarded with knowledge and insight that can potentially yield a world of informative, strategic and practical dividends.


September 15, 2018 Update: Mary Meeker has left Kleiner Perkins to start her own investment firm. The details of this are reported in an article in the New York Times entitled Mary Meeker, ‘Queen of the Internet,’ Is Leaving Kleiner Perkins to Start a New Fund, by Erin Griffith, posted on September 14, 2018. I wish her the great success for her new venture. I also hope that she will still have enough time that she can continue to publish her brilliant annual reports on Internet trends.

TechDay New York 2018: 500 Local Startups’ Displays, Demos and Delights for the Crowd

All photos on this page by Alan Rothman.

Sometimes in traditional advertising for creative works like movies, TV shows, books and plays, the quoted reviews and taglines include the exclamation “This one’s got it all!” Yet this is only rarely, if ever, true.

Well, wait a minute. Let’s check that.

Last Thursday, May 10th, I had the great pleasure of attending TechDay New York 2018, held at Pier 94, on the West Side of midtown Manhattan. This is a monumental annual exhibition of 500 startups located throughout NYC almost did have it all. In addition to all of these new companies, there were separate areas set up for brief products and services demos and talks by industry experts. Even the TV show Shark Tank was on site there.

First and foremost, massive amounts of thanks to everyone at Techday for putting on such a terrifically enjoyable, informative and memorable event. Their efforts clearly showed that they worked long and hard to get everything about it right.

On to the show …

One of New York City’s greatest economic and cultural strengths has always been its incredible global diversity of it population. So, too, is that dynamic comparably evident in the breadth of it startup ecosystem. From one end of Pier 94 to the other, there was artificial intelligence this, blockchain that, and data analytics everything infused everywhere.

Just a sampling of who and what were on display, among many others, were startups in legal services, architecture, editorial software, video search, incubators and accelerators, social media support services, event planning platforms, programmer aptitude testing, intellectual property protection, pharmacy order and delivery services, office design consultants, branding and digital experience designers, augmented and virtual reality hardware and software, venture capitalist, crowdfunding services, multi-platform public relations strategists, fashion designers, food services (some displaying much chocolate!), consumer data tracking analyst, competitive intelligence trackers and analysts, restaurant reservations, media consultants, phone apps, online security planning and systems, fully integrated electronic health records and billing systems, and dedicated tech recruiters as well as exhibitors themselves looking for new talent. Whew!

Notwithstanding the vastness of the exhibition space, hundreds of startups and thousands of attendees, the organization and presentations of the startups’ display areas was well planned and easy to navigate. The startups were grouped in helpful sectors for social media, e-commerce, fintech and others into more general categories.

The three among the twelve TechDay Talks I attended were quite compelling and evinced great enthusiasm by both the speakers and their audiences. These included:

Above all other considerations, I found every entrepreneur I stopped and spoke with, asking them to tell me about their company, to be highly enthusiastic, engaging and sincere. They were knowledgeable about their markets and competitors, sounded willing to adapt to changing market conditions and, most importantly, convinced that they would become successful. At no point did any of them move on to their next visitors until they sensed that I understood what they were saying and encouraging me to follow their progress online. They were not so much giving visitors hard sales pitches, but rather, much more of the who, what, where, how and when of their businesses. My gratitude to all of them for their patience with me and many of the other attendees I saw them talking to with the same level of professionalism.

Below are some of the photos I took while I was there. I was trying to capture some sense of infectious energy and engagement being generated across entire day’s events.

My very best wishes to all 500 startups to succeed and prosper.

 


 *   For some very worthwhile deep and wide analysis of the effects of AI upon current and future employment, I highly recommend the recently published book entitled Human + Machine: Reimagining Work in the Age of AI, by Paul Daugherty (Harvard Business Review Press, 2018).


 

 

 

 

 

Book Review of “Built: The Hidden Stories Behind Our Structures”

“Brooklyn Bridge”, Image by Antti-Jussi Kovalainen

During the summer of 2010, I worked in an office directly across the street from the World Trade Center reconstruction site. For several months while my floor was being renovated, my temporary office windows faced west looking out onto the early construction of One World Trade Center. The daily swirl of highly coordinated planning and building was one of the most remarkable things I have ever seen. Hundreds of specialized craftsmen, managers, engineers, materials suppliers and numerous more worked in complete sync with each other to precisely anchor and assemble the tremendous base of the structure. Then they began steadily assembling the 104 stories of steel, concrete and glass above it climbing inexorably towards the sky.

Each day I looked out the windows and marveled at this modern miracle as it continually coalesced into one of the tallest buildings in the world.It was as exciting and entertaining to watch in person as any concert, movie or ballgame.

So, how did this magnificent monolith go from blueprints and computer visualizations to a finely tapered tower expressly intended to endure over time, meet all the modern business and technological needs of its occupants, embed environmental comfort, ensure local building code compliance, and remain state-of-the-art safe? Quite simply, who makes sure that buildings like this and many other structures such as bridges and stadiums actually stand up straight and stay that way?

Measure Twice

“The Shard”, Image by Mike Dixson

Among the many key participants in these processes are the structural engineers. They play an integral part in making certain that everything built is comprehensively planned and assembled strictly in accordance with all relevant design specifications. Yet might this sound a bit too math-geeky to want to learn anything more about them? Well, not anymore.

First-time author and accomplished structural engineer Roma Agrawal ( @RomaTheEngineer ), has recently written a fully engaging, highly informative and deeply inspiring 360-degree look at the work of these professionals entitled Built: The Hidden Stories Behind Our Structures, (Bloomsbury Publishing Plc, 2018). She has admirably transposed the same high standards of skill and precision required to be a structural engineer into also being a writer.

In equal parts personal story, travel log, history lesson and Intro to Structural Engineering 101, Ms. Agrawal quickly captures the reader’s attention and deftly manages to maintain it throughout all 271 pages. From mud huts to coliseums to bridge to skyscrapers (among other projects, she worked on The Shard in London), we learn about who was responsible and how these creations were conceived and realized. For instance, when we admire the artistry of an archway in a building, we usually never consider all of the math, physics and fabrication2 that go into creating it. Built will give you an entirely new point of view on this and a multitude of other fundamentals of structural engineering. The text also contains a wealth of historical perspectives on how bridges, tunnels, buildings and even sewers helped civilizations to expand their populations, civil services and commerce.

The author also believes that structural engineers do not get the credit they really deserve. Nonetheless, her book is a persuasive brief for their successes in making all structures remain standing (including London Bridge and why it is not falling down), function properly, and endure extreme weather conditions and changing geological factors.  In effect, it expertly explains how they carefully process and manage a myriad of concerns about their buildings’ operations, longevity and safety.

By virtue of its own structure, the book’s 14 chapters covering building materials, design and safety principles, construction methods, noteworthy construction projects, and famous structural engineers span widely across the globe and many centuries. The lively prose is involving and evocative, so much so that these chapters could even stand on their own as individual essays. But read sequentially the mesh together to deliver a very rewarding reading experience.

Generously appointing the text are many accompanying hand-annotated photos and hand-drawn simple sketches delineating the critical principles and features being described. These simple graphics significantly support in the reader’s comprehension of some of the more sophisticated concepts as they are introduced.

Cut Once

The Colosseum, Rome, Image by Christopher Chan

There are three important themes skillfully threaded throughout the book. First, in support of the popular current movement to encourage more young women to pursue studies and employment in the fields of science, technology, engineering and math (“STEM“), Ms. Agrawal’s success in structural engineering is intended to serve as a persuasive example for others. She writes that structural engineering is still a profession mostly practiced by men and believes that more women should consider becoming a part of it. Her advancement in this field should provide a high degree of inspiration for this intended audience as well as many other readers.

Of a truly great event very well told here, Ms. Agrawal recounts the remarkable story of her personal hero, Emily Warren Roebling. When the Brooklyn Bridge was being built (1869-1883), her husband, Washington Roebling, was the chief engineer on this project. When he became ill, his wife took over and become the de facto chief engineer. She delivered critical information from her husband to his assistants on site. Moreover, she mastered all aspects of the design, physics, materials and management of the bridge and is credited with having become the essential individual in getting this supremely complicated undertaking completed. Her devotion to this endeavor was simply extraordinary. Ms. Agrawal eloquently expresses her great admiration for Emily Roebling and why she was an inspiration for her own career path.

Second, she emphasizes the importance of being well prepared for all possible contingencies in her work. There are a multitude of variables to all be taken into account when building anything and it is imperative that structural engineers be able to anticipate, assess, test and decide how to definitively deal with all of them. Such unwavering diligence and exactitude is clearly applicable to many other jobs and professions. Ms. Agrawal effectively makes her case for comprehensive planning and precision at several key junctures in her writing.

Third and equally impressive is Ms. Agrawal’s boundless enthusiasm for her work. She so enjoys and believes in what she is doing that any reader in any field can benefit from from her example.  Granted that everyone’s work situation is different and often changeable can present a range of challenges. However, when someone like the author can sustain such genuine passion for the work she is doing, reading Built may well have the added benefit of providing you with a more positive perspective on your own employment as well that of others.

As proof, a new condominium was recently being built along one of my daily walking routes. I happened to be reading Built towards the end of its construction. After finishing the book, whenever I passed this site again, I saw all of the workers and their completed building with a newly enhanced understanding and admiration of it all.  I would never have previously had this appreciation without first relying upon this book’s, well, very solid foundation.

 


In a very different and more virtual context, a method for “building” a structure in one’s own mind as form of memory enhancement device whereby someone can then fill the “rooms” with many items that can later be retrieved and thus recalled at will was first devised in the 16th century.  This story was among the many subjects of a fascinating historical account entitled The Memory Palace of Matteo Ricci, by Jonathan D. Spence (Penguin Books, 1985).


1.   See the September 1, 2015 Subway Fold post entitled A Thrilling Visit to the New One World Observatory at the Top of the World Trade Center for photos and descriptions of the amazing views from the One World Observatory very top of 1WTC.

2.  See these 10 Subway Fold posts on other recent developments in material science including, among others, such way cool stuff as Q-Carbon, self-healing concrete (also mentioned in Built at pages 106 -107), and metamaterials.