Artificial Fingerprints: Something Worth Touching Upon

"030420_1884_0077_x__s", Image by TNS Sofres

“030420_1884_0077_x__s”, Image by TNS Sofres

Among the recent advancements of the replication of various human senses, particularly for prosthetics and robotics, scientists have just made another interesting achievement in creating, of all things, artificial fingerprints. They can actually sense certain real world stimuli. This development could have some potentially very productive – – and conductive – – applications.

Could someone please cue up The Human Touch by Bruce Springsteen for this?

We looked at a similar development in artificial human vision just recently in the October 14, 2015 Subway Fold post entitled Visionary Developments: Bionic Eyes and Mechanized Rides Derived from Dragonflies.

This latest digital and all-digit story was reported in a fascinating story posted on Sciencemag.org on October 30, 2015 entitled New Artificial Fingerprints Feel Texture, Hear Sound by Hanae Armitage. I will summarize and annotate it, and then add some of my own non-artificial questions.

Design and Materials

An electronic material has been created at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign, that, while still under development in the lab “mimics the swirling design” of fingerprints. It can detect pressure, temperature and sound. The researchers who devised this believe it could be helpful in artificial limbs and perhaps even enhancing our own organic senses.

Dr. John Rogers, a member of the development team, finds this new material is an addition to the “sensor types that can be integrated with the skin”.

Scientists have been working for years on these materials called electronic skins (e-skins). Some of them can imitate the senses of human skin that can monitor pulse and temperature. (See also the October 18, 2015 Subway Fold post entitled Printable, Temporary Tattoo-like Medical Sensors are Under Development.) Dr. Hyunhyub Ko, a chemical engineer at Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology in South Korea and another member of the artificial fingerprints development team noted that there are further scientific challenges “in replicating fingertips” with their ability to sense very small differences in textures.

Sensory Perceptions

In the team’s work, Dr. Ko and the others began with “a thin, flexible material” textured with features much like human fingerprints. Next, they used this to create a “microstructured ferroelectric skin“. This contains small embedded structures called “microdomes” (as shown in an illustration accompanying the AAAS.org article), that enable the following e-skin’s sensory perceptions*:

  • Pressure: When outside pressure moves two layers of this material together it generates a small electric current that is monitored through embedded electrodes. In effect, the greater the pressure the greater the current.
  • Temperature: The e-skin relaxes in warmer temperatures and stiffens in colder temperatures, likewise generating changes in the electrical current and thus enabling it to sense temperature changes.
  • Sound: While not originally expected, the e-skin was also been found to be sensitive to sound. This occurred in testing by Dr. Ko and his team. They electronically measured the vibrations from pronouncing the letters in the word “skin” right near the e-skin. The results show this affected the microdomes and, in turn, the electric current to register changes.

Dr. Ko said his next challenge is how to transmit all of these sensations to the human brain. This has been done elsewhere using optogenetics (the use of light to control neurons that have been genetically modified) in e-skins, but he plans to research other technologies for this. Specifically, in the increasing scientific interest and development in skin-mounted sensors (such as those described in the October 18, 2015 Subway Fold post linked above), this involves a smart groups of “ideas and materials” to engineer these.

My Questions

  • Might e-skins have applications in virtual reality and augmented reality systems for medicine, engineering, manufacturing, design, robotics, architecture, and gaming? (These 11 Subway Fold posts cover a range of new developments and applications of these technologies.)
  • What other fields and marketplaces might also benefit from integrating e-skin technology? What entrepreneurial opportunities might emerge here?
  • Could e-skins work in conjunction with the system being developed in the June 27, 2015 Subway Fold post entitled Medical Researchers are Developing a “Smart Insulin Patch” ?

 


For an absolutely magnificent literary exploration of the human senses, I recommend A Natural History of the Senses by Diane Ackerman (Vintage, 1991) in the highest possible terms. It is a gem in both its sparking prose and engaging subject.


See this Wikipedia page for detailed information and online resources about the field known as haptic technology.

Data Analysis and Visualizations of All U.S. Presidential State of the Union Addresses

"President Obama's State of the Union Address 2013", Word cloud image by Kurtis Garbutt

“President Obama’s State of the Union Address 2013”, Word cloud image by Kurtis Garbutt

While data analytics and visualization tools have accumulated a significant historical record of accomplishments, now, in turn, this technology is being applied to actual significant historical accomplishments. Let’s have a look.

Every year in January, the President of the United States gives the State of the Union speech before both houses of the U.S. Congress. This is to address the condition of the nation, his legislative agenda and other national priorities. The requirement for this presentation appears in Article II of the U.S. Constitution.

This talk with the nation has been given every year (with only one exception), since 1790. The resulting total of 224 speeches presents a remarkable and dynamic historical record of U.S. history and policy. Researchers at Columbia University and the University of Paris have recently applied sophisticated data analytics and visualization tools to this trove of presidential addresses. Their findings were published in the August 10, 2015 edition of the Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences in a truly fascinating paper entitled Lexical Shifts, Substantive Changes, and Continuity in State of the Union Discourse, 1790–2014, by Alix Rule, Jean-Philippe Cointet, and Peter S. Bearman.

A very informative and concise summary of this paper was also posted in an article on Phys.org, also on August 10, 2015, entitled in a post entitled Big Data Analysis of State of the Union Remarks Changes View of American History, (no author is listed). I will summarize, annotate and post a few questions of my own. I highly recommend clicking through and reading the full report and the summary article together for a fuller perspective on this achievement. (Similar types of textual and graphical analyses of US law were covered in the May 15, 2015 Subway Fold post entitled Recent Visualization Projects Involving US Law and The Supreme Court.)

The researchers developed custom algorithms for their research. They were applied to the total number of words used in all of the addresses, from 1790 to 2014, of 1.8 million.  By identifying the frequencies of “how often words appear jointly” and “mapping their relation to other clusters of words”, the team was able to highlight “dominant social and political” issues and their relative historical time frames. (See Figure 1 at the bottom of Page 2 of the full report for this lexigraphical mapping.)

One of the researchers’ key findings was that although the topics of “industry, finance, and foreign policy” were predominant and persist throughout all of the addresses, following World War II the recurring keywords focus further upon “nation building, the regulation of business and the financing of public infrastructure”. While it is well know that these emergent terms were all about modern topics, the researchers were thus able to pinpoint the exact time frames when they first appeared. (See Page 5 of the full report for the graphic charting these data trends.)

Foreign Policy Patters

The year 1917 struck the researchers as a critical turning point because it represented a dramatic shift in the data containing words indicative of more modern times. This was the year that the US sent its troops into battle in Europe in WWI. It was then that new keywords in the State of the Union including “democracy,” “unity,” “peace” and “terror” started to appear and recur. Later, by the 1940’s, word clusters concerning the Navy appeared, possibly indicating emerging U.S. isolationism. However, they suddenly disappeared again as the U.S. became far more involved in world events.

Domestic Policy Patterns

Over time, the researchers identified changes in the terminology used when addressing domestic matters. These concerned the government’s size, economic regulation, and equal opportunity. Although the focus of the State of the Union speeches remained constant, new keywords appeared whereby “tax relief,” “incentives” and “welfare” have replaced “Treasury,” “amount” and “expenditures”.

An important issue facing this project was that during the more than two centuries being studied, keywords could substantially change in meaning over time. To address this, the researchers applied new network analysis methods developed by Jean-Philippe Cointet, a team member, co-author and physicist at the University of Paris. They were intended to identify changes whereby “some political topics morph into similar topics with common threads” as others fade away. (See Figure 3 at the bottom of Page 4 of the full paper for this enlightening graphic.*)

As a result, they were able to parse the relative meanings of words as they appear with each other and, on a more macro level, in the “context of evolving topics”. For example, it was discovered that the word “Constitution” was:

  • closely associated with the word “people” in early U.S. history
  • linked to “state” following the Civil War
  • linked to “law” during WWI and WWII, and
  • returned to “people” during the 1970’s

Thus, the meaning of “Constitution” must be assessed in its historical context.

My own questions are as follows:

  • Would this analytical approach yield new and original insights if other long-running historical records such as the Congressional Record were like subject to the research team’s algorithms and analytics?
  • Could companies and other commercial businesses derive any benefits from having their historical records similarly analyzed? For example, might it yield new insights and recommendations for corporate governance and information governance policies and procedures?
  • Could this methodology be used as an electronic discovery tool for litigators as they parse corporate documents produced during a case?

 


*  This is also resembles the methodology and appearance to the graphic on Page 29 of the law review article entitled A Quantitative Analysis of the Writing Style of the U.S. Supreme Court, by Keith Carlson, Michael A. Livermore, and Daniel Rockmore, Dated March 11, 2015, linked to and discussed with the May 15, 2015 Subway Fold post cited above.