“Hackcess to Justice” Legal Hackathons in 2014 and 2015

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Image by Sebastiaan ter Burg

 

[This post was originally uploaded on August 14, 2014. It has been updated below with new information on February 15, 2015 and again on March 24, 2015.]

August 14, 2014 Post:

Last week, the American Bar Association held its 2014 annual meeting in Boston. Among many other events and presentations, was one called Hackcess to Justice, a two-day hackathon held at Suffolk School of Law. The goal was to produce tools and apps to enable greater access to legal services for people who otherwise might not be able to obtain assistance or legal representation. A number of these problems seeking technological solutions were first identified by the Legal Services Corporation. A fully detailed report was posted on ABAnet.org on August 8, 2014, entitled Winning Apps in ‘Hackcess to Justice’ Help Write Wills, Navigate Disasters and Calculate Jail Time.

Prize money was awarded to the first, second and third place winners. The winning entries were apps, respectively, for creating and distributing living wills and health care proxies; proving information and resources to people in natural disasters; and to determine eligibility for legal help in MA and to calculate the length of state prison terms.

Recently, there have been other legal hackathons around the US. Two of them include one held at Brooklyn Law School in April 2014 and another held MIT in June 2014.

I hope to see more of these events in the future as I anticipate that they will continue to produce interesting results potentially benefiting clients and attorneys alike. I also think it will be interesting to track whether any of the tools and apps resulting from these legal hackathons gain acceptance in the marketplace for legal services.

February 15, 2015 Update:

A new Hackcess to Justice legal hackathon will be held in New Orleans on March 21 and 22, 2015. It is being presented by the ABA Journal and the New Orleans Bar Association. The details and a link to the registration page appeared in an article on ABAnet.org on February 12,, 2015 entitled Registration Opens for Hackcess to Justice New Orleans, by Lee Rawles. The event will be held at Loyola University New Orleans College of Law. Here is the link on the law school’s calendar to the event. The objectives, procedures and presentations appear to be very similar to the first Hackcess to Justice event held at Suffolk School of Law discussed above.

Once again, I am delighted to see another legal hackathon in the works. I believe that many tangible and positive results can come from such events for clients, law students, law schools, lawyers, bar associations, and the entire legal profession. My best wishes for its success in New Orleans and I hope to see these events spreading to other areas in the US and elsewhere.

March 24, 2015 Update:

A fanfare, please!

The top three winners of Hackcess to Justice competition (described in the February 15, 2015 post above), were announced on the Daily News page on the ABAJournal.com site yesterday, March 23, 2015. The article entitled Winning App at Hackess to Justice New Orleans Helps Clients Preserve Evidence, was written by Victor Li. I highly recommend clicking through and reading this for all of the details of these imaginative and innovative apps. It also has an embedded deck of tweets (with the links and hashtags remaining clickable), from the event that provide a vivid sense of this competition and the enthusiasm of its entrants.

Briefly summing up the top three winners:

  • First place went to an app called Legal Proof by a Omega Ortega LLC. This enables users to photograph documents and other evidence, generate metadata for it, and record additional relevant data.
  • Second place was awarded to attorneys William Palin and Ernie Svenson for a document generation app they call Paperless. This is designed specifically for legal aid attorneys to ascertain client eligibility, exchange legal documents, and transmit reminders concerning legal dates and issues.
  • Third place was won by a New Orleans non-profit called Operation Spark that promotes careers in software for young people. Their winning app is called ExpungeMe. This helps users to generate documents needed to prepare an expungement request without an attorney.

Massive amounts of congratulations to all of the winners!

Let’s continue to track these important events and the exciting new apps that are emerging from them.

Visualization, Interpretation and Inspiration from Mapping Twitter Networks

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Image by Marc Smith

[This post was originally uploaded on September 26, 2014. It has been updated below with new information on February 5, 2015.]

Have you ever wondered what a visual map of your Twitter network might look like? The realization of such Twitter topography was covered in a terrific post on September 24, 2014 on socialmediatoday.com entitled How to Create a Visual Map of Your Twitter Network by Mary Ellen Egan.

To briefly sum up, at the recent Social Shake-Up Conference in Atlanta sponsored by SocialMediaToday, the Social Research Foundation created and presented such a map. They generated it by including 513 Twitter users who participated for four days in the hashtag #socialshakeup. The platform used is called NodeXL. The resulting graphic of the results as shown in this article are extraordinary. Please pay particular attention as to how the “influencers” in this network are identified and their characteristics. I strongly urge you to click through to read this article and see this display.

For an additional deep dive and comprehensive study on Twitter network mapping mechanics, analyses and policy implications accompanied by numerous examples of how Twitter networks form, grow, transform and behave, I also very highly recommend a report posted on February 20, 2014, entitled Mapping Twitter Topic Networks: From Polarized Crowds to Community Clusters by Marc A. Smith, Lee Rainie, Ben Shneiderman and Itai Himelboim for the Pew Foundation Internet Project.

I believe this article and report will quite likely spark your imagination. I think it is safe to assume that many users would be intrigued by this capability and, moreover, would devise new and innovative ways to leverage the data to better understand, grow and plot strategy to enhance their Twitter networks. Some questions I propose for such an analysis while inspecting a Twitter map include:

  • Am I reaching my target audience? Is this map reliable as a sole indicator or should others be used?
  • Who are the key influencers in my network? Once identified, can it be determined why they are influencers?
  • Does my growth strategy depend on promoting retweets, growing the population of followers, getting mentioned in relevant publications and websites, or other possible approaches?

What I would really be like to see emerge is a 3-dimensional form of visual map that fully integrates multiple maps of an  individual’s or group’s or company’s online presence to simultaneously include their Twitter, Facebook, LinkedIn¹, Instagram and other social networks. Maybe a platform like the Hyve-3D visualization system² could be used to enable a more broadly extensible and scalable 3D view. Perhaps this multi-dimensional virtual construct could produce entirely new planning and insights for optimizing one’s presence, marketing and influence in social media.

If so, would new trends and influencers not previously seen then be identified? Could tools be developed in this system whereby users would test the strengths and weaknesses of certain cross-social media platforms links and relationships? Would certain industries such news networks³ be able to spot events and trends much sooner? Are there any potentially new opportunities here for entrepreneurs?

February 5, 2015 Update:

A very instructive and illuminating example of the power of mapping a specialized Twitter network has just been posted by Ryan Whelan, a law and doctoral student at Northwestern University. It is composed of US law school professors who are now actively Tweeting away. He posted his methodology, an interactive graphic of this network, and one supporting graph plus four data tables on his blog in a February 3, 2015 post entitled The Law Prof Twitter Network 2.0. I highly recommend clicking through and reading this in its entirety. Try clicking on the graphic to activate a set of tools to explore and query this network map. As well, the tables illustrate the relative sensitivities of the data and their impact on the graphic when particular members of the network or the origins and groupings of the followers is examined.

I think you find it inspiring in thinking about what situations such a network map might be helpful to you in work, school, special interest groups, and many other potential applications. Mr. Whelan presents plenty of information to get you started off in the right direction.

I also found the look and feel of the network map to be very similar to the network mapping tool that was previously available on LinkedIn and discussed in the August 14, 2014 Subway Fold post entitled 2014 LinkedIn Usage Trends and Additional Data Questions.

My questions are as follows:

  • What effects, if any, is this network and its structure having upon improving the legal education system? That is, are these professors, by being active on Twitter in their own handle and as members of this network as followers of each other, benefiting the professor’s work and/or law students’ classroom and learning experiences?
  • Are the characteristics of this network of legal academics any different from, let’s say, a Twitter network of medical school professors or high school teachers?
  • Would more of a meta-study of networks within the legal profession produce results that would be helpful to lawyers and their clients? For example, what would Twitter maps of corporate lawyers, litigators and public interest attorneys show that might be helpful and to whom?

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1.  See the April 10, 2014 Subway Fold post entitled Visualization Tool for LinkedIn Personal Networks.

2 See the August 28, 2014 Subway Fold post entitled Hyve-3D: A New 3D Immersive and Collaborative Design System

3.   See also a most interesting article published in the September 23, 2014 edition of The New York Times entitled Tool Called Dataminr Hunts for News in the Din of Twitter by Leslie Kaufman about such a system that is scanning and interpolating possible news emerging from the Twitter-sphere.

New Law School Courses Aim at Keeping Pace with Changing Times

In their ongoing efforts to keep pace with rapidly changing times and legal needs, a number of US law schools are offering some interesting new electives. As detailed in this an article entitled New Law School Courses Take on Robots, Videogames and Piketty-mania that appeared on The Wall Street Journal’s Law Blog on June 24, 2014, these include courses covering:

  • Thomas Piketty’s current bestseller Capital in the Twenty First Century, at Yale
  • Video Game Law, at Pepperdine
  • Robotics, at Yale
  • Law and Neuroscience, at Harvard
  • Spectacle and Surveillance, at Columbia

I highly recommend a click-through for all of the particulars to these new offerings. Links are also embedded in this article to each respective law school’s web site for full descriptions about these classes.

I think it will continue to be interesting to monitor new law school courses into the future as an indicator of their adaptations to changing needs in the marketplace for legal services. Additional follow would also be helpful in assessing whether these courses make any difference in law students finding employment in these nascent fields.

Recent Conferences Addressing Changes and Innovation in the Legal Marketplace

During the past few months, I have had the opportunities to attend, either in person or by webcast, four conferences addressing the dramatic technological, business and service changes affecting all sectors of the legal market. The speakers have covered such topics as legal entrepreneurs, big data and analytics, project management, adding design elements law practice, enhancing law schools’ offerings with business and tech skills, collaboration methodologies and platforms, pricing models, expert systems, legal apps, addressing under-served markets for legal services, and ethical considerations posed by many of these changes. The links below contain videos of many of these presentations and offer an incisive window into how various innovators and their innovations are leading the way towards meeting these challenges.

  • Reinvent Law NYC held on February 7, 2014 at Cooper Union in New York is part of the ongoing series of Reinvent Law presentations being organized by the Reinvent Law Laboratory at Michigan State Law School. This show was standing room only on what was a very bitter cold day in NYC. IMHO, everyone involved in the production and presentation of this did an outstanding job of directly defining and addressing the current and future technological and business issues. Videos of some of the presentations from this and other Reinvent Law events are available on the site’s Reinvent Law Channel.
  • Disruptive Innovation in the Market for Legal Services was a day-long conference at Harvard Law School held on March 6, 2014 covering many of the same concerns. I found the concluding Q&A session with the last panel of speakers to be particularly compelling.
  • LegalScience.TV was a graduate seminar presented at MIT’s Media Lab on March 13, 2014. Many of the speakers focused on the more scientific and technological influences and innovations in law practice.
  • From Bleak House to Geek House: Evolving Law for Entrepreneurial Lawyers was another all day conference held last week at Brooklyn Law School on April 4, 2014. The details are clickable here and the videos are gathered here on YouTube.  Among a great many other things expertly covered by the speakers, was the changing needs of today’s legal education.

The next conference on many of these issues, themes and advances will be Codex Presents the Future of Law 2014 conference to be held at Stanford Law School on May 2, 2014. Here is the agenda of what sounds like a top flight lineup of speakers and their topics.