Ledger Domain: How and Why Marketers Can Improve Their Implementations of the Blockchain

Looking At Milky Way, Image by Wall Boat

Is there any product, service or technology out there today that’s just a click away from offering people the virtual equivalent of a cure for the common cold that costs less than a dollar and tastes better than chocolate? No, of course not. But as new innovations inevitably rise and fall along the waves of the tech hype cycle, the true potential of The Next Big Tech Thing often takes years to become fully realized and optimized for a deep and wide variety of markets.

One of today’s leading candidates competing for this top-level billing is the blockchain.¹ It is enjoying massive media buzz, investment and experimentation in configuring it for a diversity of applications including, among many others, food supply chains, financial services and artists rights. This technology is providing new means to accomplish business tasks more securely and reliably, thus increasing operational efficiencies.

Yet whether the blockchain can and will fully and effectively scale in all circumstances still remains to be seen by many sectors of the business world. An inherently key question at the very heart of the blockchain’s growth and acceptance is whether marketers and advertisers can leverage many of its technological virtues and, if so, how they can best accomplish this?

Taking a deeply insightful and informative look at of the latest developments concerning this is a highly informative recent article entitled How Blockchain Can Help Marketers Build Better Relationships with Their Customers, by Campbell R. Harvey, Christine Moorman and Marc Toledo, posted on the Harvard Business Review website on October 1, 2018. I highly recommend a click-through and full read if you have an opportunity.

I will summarize and annotate this, reference in some related Subway Fold posts, and then pose some of my own ad-free questions.

The Benefits of Diminishing Transaction Costs

Economic Gardening, Image by Missy Schmidt

According to a February 2018 CMO Survey, just 8% of its participants rated the usage of the blockchain in their marketing operations as being “moderately or very important”. This technology is still “not well understood” among marketers and perceived as being over-hyped. This has resulted in a “wait and see” attitude about it. Nonetheless, there are compelling reasons to understand the blockchain and build specific marketing applications for it that will be more likely to benefit early adopters and innovators.

The blockchain’s virtues of “transparency, immutability and security” make it very suitable for a wide range of transactional and managerial functions. Likewise, it lowers the costs involved in executing all of these activities and, even more importantly, the need to rely so heavily on the web’s giant advertising intermediaries (primarily Google and Facebook), may be reduced. As well, the means now exist using this technology to permit consumers to better “own and control” their personal data.²

Currently, electronic transactions using credit and debit cards involve significant costs to online and real-world vendors. These associated costs are passed along to consumers. Sellers often set minimum purchase thresholds to maintain their profitability.

However, the transactional costs of using the blockchain are approaching zero. For example, MasterCard and Visa have implemented blockchain-based alternative systems enabling customers to “send money in any local currency”, without using a credit card. This again removes any embedded intermediaries and “connects directly to the banks” involved. Consequently, cross-border fees can be dispensed.

There are other advantages emerging for marketers and advertisers involving exchanges of real monetary value with consumers. Rather than these professionals all relying on third-parties such as Facebook for acquiring troves of customer data, they could instead use a system of micropayments³ to directly reward consumers for their personal data. For instance, under this alternative model, a supermarket chain could provide shoppers with a mobile app that pays them to install it, tracks their location, and use it for special deals on merchandise at personalized prices4.

Similarly, marketers could employ the use of smart contracts that vitiate the “need for validation, review, or authentication by intermediaries”. These can be engaged when participants subscribe to an email newsletter or customer rewards program. (More on this below.) The micropayments here are dispensed to consumers whenever they respond to a vendor’s emails or advertisements.

Like Flamingo Synapses, Image by Donal Mountain

Alleviating Google’s and Facebook’s Dominance in Online Advertising

This direct-reward-to-consumers architecture could similarly be deployed for the engagement of website ads. Presently, most users are put off by the current system of intrusive pop-ups and other forms of unavoidable online advertising. A growing Web-wide push back to this has been the use of ad-blocking browser add-ons.5

New alternatives based upon the blockchain can “recapture” some this lost ad revenue by directly compensating online consumers “for their attention”6. This could potentially diminish Google’s and Facebook’s lock on the majority of online ad and data revenues.7 Blockchain options will also enable individuals to “control their own online profiles and social graphs”.8

Taken together, these possibilities might permit companies to:

  • interact directly with their consumers
  • bypass patronizing the social media and search giants, and
  • avoid relentless email solicitations and “follow-me ads”

Furthermore, meaningful cost savings can be directly passed along to consumers by virtue of this voluntarily consumed advertising via these types of blockchain-supported conduits.

Image from Pixabay.com

Shutting Down Online Frauds and Spam

By 2016, $7.6 billion was appropriated by “fraudulent or deceptive activity” and is expected to increase soon to nearly $11 billion. Nonetheless, marketing teams who deploy the blockchain to “track their ads” can:

  • maintain control over their online activities
  • be more confident that expenditures are going to “ROI-generating activities”, and
  • measure the effects of their efforts on a per-user and per-mail scale

Thus, to the benefit of marketers and vendors and to the detriment of bad actors online are the following technological advantages:

Verification: The blockchain can be used to provide verification of “the origin and methodology of marketers”. It can likewise reduce or eliminate large-scale phishing spam through the use of micropayments to the recipients of marketing emails. This will enable “companies to identify consumers” who are genuinely interested in their offerings. Micropayments could then be dispensed in exchange for access to various forms of onscreen content.

Security: Such implementations could also potentially defeat malicious hacks using denial of service attacks (DoS) and could make social media sites more resistant to automated bot accounts. The former are attempts to overwhelm web servers with a flood of traffic and latter are widely used for massive distributions of deceptive information, as well as to illegally appropriate “online advertising from big brands”.

Authenticity: A user’s bonafides is one of the main cornerstones of the blockchain. Turning this into a service, Keybase.io is a company currently working on reducing social media fraud. Their blockchain-enabled app permits individual users to prove they are the “rightful owners” of various social media account. This makes marketing easier to monitor and advertising expenses more supportable.

“Origami Fish – Made by June”, image by Penny

Increasing Revenues from Media Viewership

Original and editorial web content built upon blockchain technology can potentially permit media companies to increase their “quality control and copyright protection”.9 For example, Kodak has developed a new product called KODAKOne, an image rights and distribution platform. It uses the blockchain to record the ownership rights to individual images. Photographers will be awarded greater control over their work than they currently have with how their pictures distribution online. In the future, photographers will automatically be sent payments whenever their content is used. This could probably also be used for video content creators whose work has gone viral.

A company called Coupit also uses blockchain tech to enable marketers to join loyalty and affiliate programs whereby consumers can opt-in and “trade rewards with each other”. As a result, marketers can increase their “visibility and transparency” in order to distinguish inactive from loyal consumers. They can next sharpen their marketing strategies to distribute “targeted offers” to each of these categories.

In those cases where marketers employ a data aggregator or analytics processor, using micropayments will permit companies to circumvent ad-blocking apps10. For consumers, this gives then more fine-point control over their personal data and privacy, and rewards them for their willingness to view advertising that they have chosen.

Taking an alternative approach to content monetization is a new web browser called Brave. In addition to providing many built-in privacy and security features, it contains a blockchain-based feature called Basic Attention Tokens (BATs). These enable “publishers to monetize value added services” whereby users can dispense these tokens to sites they choose for content they select.

“The Crystal Ball”, Image by Gyorgy Soponyai

Companies and Consumers are Both Beneficiaries

Along with the progression of the blockchain’s reach and capabilities, business “intermediaries will need to adapt” accordingly. As discussed above, consumers will be exercising increased control and discretion over how they decide to engage with advertisers and Web threats such as spam and phishing will become self-limiting as their current tactics will be economically undermined.

Balancing this power and attention shift, companies might be able to exert greater control over the “quality of inbound traffic” to their marketing programs and achieve greater understanding of their customers’ needs and motivations.  When pursuing such “high value customers”, these economic incentives will perhaps result in a correspondingly increase in value.

Given all of these advantages that marketers and advertisers have to gain from further embracing blockchain technology, “finding ways to design and implement” them should be a joint effort among corporate decision-makers not just in marketing but also from the strategy, finance and technology departments. Moreover, innovative applications of the blockchain may ultimately be more beneficially in connecting marketers and advertisers with their intended audiences in ways that may have not been otherwise previously possible.

My Questions

  • Given that Google and Facebook currently have an overwhelming lock on online advertising’s multi-$billion revenue streams, will they meet any potential challenges to this with their own blockchain-founded variants? If so, how might they be different in their approach to benefit both advertisers and consumers? At the very least, do they even perceive this as a legitimate threat to their business models?
  • In addition to rewarding consumers with micropayments for ad clicks and content views, what, if anything, could companies do to correspondingly build incentives into their pricing structures for consumers’ purchasers? How should pricing be affected for repeat or bulk purchases by consumers? What if consumers make referrals of additional interested consumers to these blockchain-based vendors?
  • Would using mixed media such as augmented reality and virtual reality lend themselves to blockchain-based marketing implementations to further attract new potential consumers? That is, in return for micropayments disbursed to capture users’ attention, might enhanced advertising or content consumption experiences benefit both advertisers and consumers who would both end up feeling as though they are receiving added value for their participation?
  • What new entrepreneurial opportunities for goods, services and technologies might arise from these new and extensible blockchain-based marketing capabilities?

 


1.  Some examples of earlier implementations of blockchain technology were covered in these Subway Fold posts.

2.  X-ref to the concluding paragraph of the June 7, 2018 Subway Fold post entitled Single File, Everyone: The Advent of the Universal Digital Profile, concerning another innovative effort to return full control of personal data to consumers called the Hub of All Things. Two other similar startups that have emerged during the past few weeks are Inrupt and Helm. This is starting to become a very interesting and innovative space. Furthermore, there was a fascinating and far-ranging article in The New York Times on October 19, 2018, entitled How the Blockchain Could Break Big Tech’s Hold on A.I., by Nathaniel Popper, exploring the possibility of using the blockchain as a means for individuals to control and distribute some of their personal information to be used in AI databases.

3.  Virtual reality pioneer, Microsoft scientist and author Jaron Lanier presented a persuasive case for this, among many other thought-provoking insights about the digital world, in his book entitled Who Owns the Future? (Simon & Schuster, 2013). Highly recommended reading if you have an opportunity.

4Amazon constantly and widely varies it prices based on all of the personal and market data they have accumulated as reported in an article posted on BusinessInsider.com on August 10, 2018, entitled Amazon Changes Prices on Its Products About Every 10 minutes — Here’s How and Why They Do It, by Neel Mehta, Parth Detroja, and Aditya Agashe.

5.  For example, AdBlock and Ghostery, among others, are browser add-ons that can effectively remove nearly all online ads. These apps are continually updated by their developers.

6.  Columbia University Law School professor and New York Times contributing opinion writer Tim Wu wrote a highly engaging book on the past, present and future of how advertising and mass media compete for our attention entitled The Attention Merchants The Attention Merchants: The Epic Scramble to Get Inside Our Heads, (Alfred A. Knopf, 2016). It is very worthwhile reading for its originality and insights.

7.  See the July 25, 2018 Subway Fold post entitled Book Review of “Frenemies: The Epic Disruption of the Ad Business (and Everything Else)” for more detailed coverage on the current state of the online advertising market.

8.  See again the June 7, 2018 Subway Fold post entitled Single File, Everyone: The Advent of the Universal Digital Profile for some of the emerging innovative alternatives in this space.

9.  See also these Subway Fold posts in the category of Intellectual Property.

10.  See the August 13, 2015 Subway Fold post entitled New Report Finds Ad Blockers are Quickly Spreading and Costing $Billions in Lost Revenue.

The Mediachain Project: Developing a Global Creative Rights Database Using Blockchain Technology

Image from Pixabay

Image from Pixabay

When people are dating it is often said that they are looking for “Mr. Right” or “Ms. Right”. That is, finding someone who is just the right romantic match for them.

In the case of today’s rapid development, experimentation and implementation of blockchain technology, if a startup’s new technology takes hold, it might soon find a highly productive (but maybe not so romantic) match in finding Mr. or Ms. [literal] Right by deploying the blockchain as a form of global registry of creative works ownership.

These 5 Subway Fold posts have followed just a few of the voluminous developments in bitcoin and blockchain technologies. Among them, the August 21, 2015 post entitled Two Startups’ Note-Worthy Efforts to Adapt Blockchain Technology for the Music Industry has drawn the most number of clicks. A new report on Coindesk.com on February 23, 2016 entitled Mediachain is Using Blockchain to Create a Global Rights Database by Pete Rizzo provides a most interesting and worthwhile follow on related to this topic. I recommend reading it in its entirety. I will summarize and annotate it to provide some additional context, and then pose several of my own questions.

Producing a New Protocol for Ownership, Protection and Monetization

Applications of blockchain technology for the potential management of economic and distribution benefits of “creative professions”, including writers, musicians and others, that have been significantly affected by prolific online file copying still remains relatively unexplored. As a result, they do not yet have the means to “prove and protect ownership” of their work. Moreover, they do have an adequate system to monetize their digital works. But the blockchain, by virtue of its structural and operational nature, can supply these creators with “provenance, identity and micropayments“. (See also the October 27, 2015 Subway Fold post entitled Summary of the Bitcoin Seminar Held at Kaye Scholer in New York on October 15, 2015 for some background on these three elements.)

Now on to the efforts of a startup called Mine ( @mine_labs ), co-founded by Jesse Walden and Denis Nazarov¹. They are preparing to launch a new metadata protocol called Mediachain that enables creators working in digital media to write data describing their work along with a timestamp directly onto the blockchain. (Yet another opportunity to go out on a sort of, well, date.)  This system is based upon the InterPlanetary File System (IPFS). Mine believes that IPSF is a “more readable format” than others presently available.

Walden thinks that Mediachain’s “decentralized nature”, rather than a more centralized model, is critical to its objectives. Previously, a very “high-profile” somewhat similar initiative to establish a similarly global “database of musical rights and works” called the Global Repertoire Database (GDR) had failed.

(Mine maintains this page of a dozen recent posts on Medium.com about their technology that provides some interesting perspectives and details about the Mediachain project.)

Mediachain’s Objectives

Walden and Nazarov have tried to innovate by means of changing how media businesses interact with the Internet, as opposed to trying to get them to work within its established standards. Thus, the Mediachain project has emerged with its focal point being the inclusion of descriptive data and attribution for image files by combining blockchain technology and machine learning². As well, it can accommodate reverse queries to identify the creators of images.

Nazarov views Mediachain “as a global rights database for images”. When used in conjunction with, among others, Instagram, he and Walden foresee a time when users of this technology can retrieve “historic information” about a file. By doing so, they intend to assist in “preserving identity”, given the present challenges of enforcing creator rights and “monetizing content”. In the future, they hope that Mediachain inspires the development of new platforms for music and movies that would permit ready access to “identifying information for creative works”. According to Walden, their objective is to “unbundle identity and distribution” and provide the means to build new and more modern platforms to distribute creative works.

Potential Applications for Public Institutions

Mine’s co-founders believe that there is further meaningful potential for Mediachain to be used by public organizations who provide “open data sets for images used in galleries, libraries and archives”. For example:

  • The Metropolitan Museum of Art (“The Met” as it is referred to on their website and by all of my fellow New York City residents), has a mandate to license the metadata about the contents of their collections. The museum might have a “metadata platform” of its own to host many such projects.
  • The New York Public Library has used their own historical images, that are available to the public to, among other things, create maps.³ Nazarov and Walden believe they could “bootstrap the effort” by promoting Mediachain’s expanded apps in “consumer-facing projects”.

Maintaining the Platform Security, Integrity and Extensibility

Prior to Mediachain’s pending launch, Walden and Nazarov are highly interested in protecting the platform’s legitimate users from “bad actors” who might wrongfully claim ownership of others’ rightfully owned works. As a result, to ensure the “trust of its users”, their strategy is to engage public institutions as a model upon which to base this. Specifically, Mine’s developers are adding key functionality to Mediachain that enables the annotation of images.

The new platform will also include a “reputation system” so that subsequent users will start to “trust the information on its platform”. In effect, their methodology empowers users “to vouch for a metadata’s correctness”. The co-founders also believe that the “Mediachain community” will increase or decrease trust in the long-term depending on how it operates as an “open access resource”. Nazarov pointed to the success of Wikipedia to characterize this.

Following the launch of Mediachain, the startup’s team believes this technology could be integrated into other existing social media sites such as the blogging platform Tumblr. Here they think it would enable users to search images including those that may have been subsequently altered for various purposes. As a result, Tumblr would then be able to improve its monetization efforts through the application of better web usage analytics.

The same level of potential, by virtue of using Mediachain, may likewise be found waiting on still other established social media platforms. Nazarov and Walden mentioned seeing Apple and Facebook as prospects for exploration. Nazarov said that, for instance, Coindesk.com could set its own terms for its usage and consumption on Facebook Instant Articles (a platform used by publishers to distribute their multimedia content on FB). Thereafter, Mediachain could possibly facilitate the emergence of entirely new innovative media services.

Nazarov and Walden temper their optimism because the underlying IPFS basis is so new and acceptance and adoption of it may take time. As well, they anticipate “subsequent issues” concerning the platform’s durability and the creation of “standards for metadata”. Overall though, they remain sanguine about Mediachain’s prospects and are presently seeking developers to embrace these challenges.

My Questions

  • How would new platforms and apps using Mediachain and IPSF be affected by the copyright and patent laws and procedures of the US and other nations?
  • How would applications built upon Mediachain affect or integrate with digital creative works distributed by means of a Creative Commons license?
  • What new entrepreneurial opportunities for startup services might arise if this technology eventually gains web-wide adoption and trust among creative communities?  For example, would lawyers and accountants, among many others, with clients in the arts need to develop and offer new forms of guidance and services to navigate a Mediachain-enabled marketplace?
  • How and by whom should standards for using Mediachain and other potential development path splits (also known as “forks“), be established and managed with a high level of transparency for all interested parties?
  • Does analogizing what Bitcoin is to the blockchain also hold equally true for what Mediachain is to the blockchain, or should alternative analogies and perspectives be developed to assist in the explanation, acceptance and usage of this new platform?

June 1, 2016 Update:  For an informative new report on Mediachain’s activities since this post was uploaded in March, I recommend clicking through and reading Mediachain Enivisions a Blockchain-based Tool for Identifying Artists’ Work Across the Internet, by Jonathan Shieber, posted today on TechCrunch.com.


1.   This link from Mine’s website is to an article entitled Introducing Mediachain by Denis Nazarov, originally published on Medium.com on January 2, 2016. He mentions in his text an earlier startup called Diaspora that ultimately failed in its attempt at creating something akin to the Mediachain project. This December 4, 2014 Subway Fold post entitled Book Review of “More Awesome Than Money” concerned a book that expertly explored the fascinating and ultimately tragic inside story of Diaspora.

2.   Many of the more than two dozen Subway Fold posts in the category of Smart Systems cover some of the recent news, trends and applications in machine learning.

3.  For details, see the January 5, 2016 posting on the NY Public Library’s website entitled Free for All: NYPL Enhances Public Domain Collections for Sharing and Reuse, by Shana Kimball and Steven A. Schwarzman.