New Strata-Gem Produces “Q-Carbon” – A Substance Stronger and Brighter than Diamonds

"Diamond", Image by Hisham Alqawsi

“Diamond”, Image by Hisham Alqawsi

There are eight Bruce Springsteen songs specifically containing the word “diamond” in their lyrics.¹ My favorite among them is from his song Better Days containing the line “Your heart like a diamond shone”. It is a highly evocative image from a deeply powerful song that has a special meaning of hope to many of his fans.

This line quickly sprang to mind when I read a fascinating new article posted on Smithsonian.com on December 2, 2015 entitled Weird New Type of Carbon Is Harder (and Brighter) Than Diamond by Maya Wei-Haas. This is a story about scientists at North Carolina State University² who have just announced the fabrication of Q-Carbon, a substance that is harder and brighter than diamonds as well as having magnetic and glowing properties. I will summarize and annotate it, and pose a few carbon-based questions of my own.

While “Q-carbon” surely sounds far less romantic and is not likely to appear in Bruce’s lyrics anytime soon  – – “Your heart like Q-carbon shone”? – – nah, I just don’t think so – – these four adjectives still seem fitting for both Bruce’s rock and this new material’s roll. For now, let’s focus on the latter in its new diamond setting.

It has taken the North Carolina State University team decades to develop and fabricate Q-carbon. Their invention can make diamonds quickly and at room temperature without using traditional methods of creating industrial diamonds by apply high pressure and high heat to carbon. Moreover, their work also led them to develop this additional “new phase of carbon” called Q-carbon. Their findings were published online on November 30, 2015 in the Journal of Applied Physics in a paper entitled Novel Phase of Carbon, Ferromagnetism, and Conversion into Diamond by Jagdish Narayan and Anagh Bhaumik.

According to Mr. Narayan, the key to this new method’s success is in its speed. At normal room temperature, the team applied “extremely short laser pulses” to amorphous carbon (which has no crystal structure). This heated the material to 6,740°F. When this “puddle” was very rapidly cooled, the Q-carbon then formed.

The scientists found it was harder than regular diamonds, exhibited ferroelectric (magnetic) properties, and was able to give off “small amounts of light”.  Among the anticipated applications for Q-carbon are in developing electronic displays, electronic components, and assisting in “understanding the magnetism of other planets”.

Its most current (no pun intended) use is in improving diamond fabrication. By varying the rates at which the carbon “puddles” are cooled, diamonds can be formed into specialized structure including “nanoneedles, microneedles³, nanodots and films”. Other fields such as medicine and abrasives4 may also benefit from this development.

This new methodology is also relatively inexpensive since its uses an existing  laser system otherwise used in eye surgery. It is likewise very fast as it can produce “a carat in about 15 minutes” according to Mr. Narayan. He is also optimistic that the diamonds can be scaled up from their current size of 70 microns by widening the side of the laser’s beam. (The Smithsonian.com article linked to above contains a photo of these new diamonds.)

The team is now working on further understanding and testing the properties of Q-carbon.

My questions are as follows:

  • What other industries and marketplaces might benefit from Q-carbon and/or the innovative methods used to produce it?
  • Are there other new molecular forms of carbon still to be found in addition to Q-carbon given that the last 30 years have brought us the discoveries and development of graphene. nanotubes and buckminsterfullerines?
  • Should Q-carbon be evaluated as a possible metamaterial because it appears to have some of the physical qualities of these substances as described in the April 10, 2015 Subway Fold post entitled The Next Wave in High Tech Materials Science ?

 


A sampling of additional press coverage on this story from the past week includes:


1.  See 10 Bruce Springsteen Songs That Reference Diamonds and Jewelry by Daniel Ford, posted on JCKonline.com on September 11, 2013.

2.  North Carolina State University scientists were also involved in the June 27, 2015 Subway Fold post entitled Medical Researchers are Developing a “Smart Insulin Patch”.

3.  “Microneedles” were also first mentioned in the same post as Footnote 2 above.

4Does this include car alarms that only seem to go off at 4:00 am in the morning in my neighborhood?

Prints Charming: A New App Combines Music With 3D Printing

"Totem", Image by Brooke Novak

“Totem”, Image by Brooke Novak

What does a song actually look like in 3D? Everyone knows that music has always been evocative of all kinds of people, memories, emotions and sensations. In a Subway Fold post back on November 30, 2014, we first looked at Music Visualizations and Visualizations About Music. But can a representation of a tune now be taken further and transformed into a tangible object?

Yes, and it looks pretty darn cool. A fascinating article was posted on Wired.com on July 15, 2015, entitled What Songs Look Like as 3-D Printed Sculptures by Liz Stinson, about a new Kickstarter campaign to raise funding for the NYC startup called Reify working on this. I will sum up, annotate and try to sculpt a few questions of my own.

Reify’s technology uses sound waves in conjunction with 3D printing¹ to shape a physical “totem” or object of it. (The Wired article and the Reify website contain pictures of samples.) Then an augmented reality² app in a mobile device will provide an on-screen visual experience accompanying the song when the camera is pointed towards it. This page on their website contains a video of a demo of their system.

The firm is led by Allison Wood and Kei Gowda. Ms. Wood founded it in order to study “digital synesthesia”. (Synthesia is a rare condition where people can use multiple senses in unusual combinations to, for example, “hear” colors, and was previously covered in the Subway Fold post about music visualization linked to above.) She began to explore how to “translate music’s ephemeral nature” into a genuine object and came up with the concept of using a totem.

Designing each totem is an individualized process. It starts with analyzing a song’s “structure, rhythm, amplitude, and more” by playing it through the Echo Nest API.³ In turn, the results generated correspond to measurements including “height, weight and mass”. The tempo and genre of a song also have a direct influence on the shaping of the totem. As well, the musical artists themselves have significant input into the final form.

The mobile app comes into play when it is used to “read” the totem and interpret its form “like a stylus on a record player or a laser on a CD”. The result is, while the music playing, the augmented reality component of the app captures and then generates an animated visualization incorporating the totem on-screen.  The process is vividly shown in the demo video linked above.

Reify’s work can also be likened to a form of information design in the form of data visualization4. According to Ms. Wood, the process involves “translating data from one form into another”.

My questions are as follows:

  • Is Reify working with, or considering working with, Microsoft on its pending HoloLens augmented reality system and/or companies such as Oculus, Samsung and Google on their virtual reality platforms as covered in the posts linked to in Footnote 2 below?
  • How might Reify’s system be integrated into the marketing strategies of musicians? For example, perhaps printing up a number of totems for a band and then distributing them at concerts.
  • Would long-established musicians and performers possibly use Reify to create totems of some their classics? For instance, what might a totem and augmented reality visualization for Springsteen’s anthem, Born to Run, look like?

1.  See these two Subway Fold posts mentioning 3D printing.

2.  See these eight Subway Fold posts covering some of the latest developments in virtual and augmented reality.

3API’s in a medical and scientific context were covered in a July 2, 2015 Subway Fold Post entitled The Need for Specialized Application Programming Interfaces for Human Genomics R&D Initiatives.

4.  This topic is covered extensively in dozens of Subway Fold posts in the Big Data and Analytics and Visualization categories.

Companies Are Forming Digital Advisory Panels To Help Keep Pace With Trending Technologies

"Empty Boardroom", Image by reynermedia

“Empty Boardroom”, Image by reynermedia

As a result of the lightening-fast rates of change in social media, big data and analytics, and online commerce¹, some large corporations have recently created digital advisory panels (also called  “boards”, “councils” and “groups” in place of “panels”), to assist executives in keeping pace with implementing some of the latest technologies. These panels are being patterned as less formal and scaled-down counterparts of traditional boards of directors.

This story was covered in a fascinating and very instructive article in the June 10, 2015 edition of The Wall Street Journal entitled “Companies Set Up Advisory Boards to Improve Digital Savvy” (subscription required, however, the article is fully available here on nasdaq.com). I will sum up, annotate and add a few questions of my own.

These digital advisory panels are often composed of “six outside experts under 50 years old”. In regularly scheduled meetings, their objective is to assist corporate managers in reaching diverse demographics and using new tools such as virtual reality² for marketing purposes. The executives whom the panels serve are appreciative of their “honest feedback”, access to entrepreneurs, and perspectives on these digital matters.

George L. Davis at the executive recruiting firm Egon Zehnder reports that approximately 50 companies in the Fortune 500 have already set up digital advisory panels. These include, among others, Target Corp. (details below) and American Express. However, not all such panels have not continued to stay in operation.

Here are the experiences of three major corporations with their digital advisory panels:

1. General Electric

GE’s digital advisory panel has met every quarter since its inception in 2011. Its members are drawn from a diversity of fields such as gaming and data visualization³. The youngest member of their 2014 panel was Christina Xu. She is a co-founder of a consulting company called PL Data. She found her experience with GE to be “an interesting window” into a corporate environment.

Ms. Xu played a key role in creating something new that has already drawn eight million downloads. It’s called the GE Sound Pack, a collection of factory sounds recorded at their own industrial facilities, intended for use by musicians4.  In effect, with projects like this the company is using the web in new ways to enhance its online presence and reputation.

GE’s panel also participated in the company’s remembrance of the 45th anniversary of the first moon landing. Back then, the company made the silicon rubber for the Apollo 11 astronauts’ boots. To commemorate in 2014, the panel convinced GE to create and market a limited edition line of “Moon Boot” sneakers online. They sold out in seven minutes. (For more details but, unfortunately, no more chances to get a pair of these way cool sneakers, see an article with photos of them entitled GE Modernizes Moon Boots and Sells Them as Sneakers, by Belinda Lanks, posted on Bloomberg.com on July 16, 2014 .)

2.  Target Corporation

On Target’s digital advisory council,  Ajay Agarwal, who is the Managing Director of Bain Capital Ventures in Palo Alto, California, is one of its four members. He was told by the company that “there were ‘no sacred cows’ “. Among the council’s recommendations was to increase Target’s staff of data scientists faster than originally planned, and to deploy new forms of in-store and online product displays.

Another council member, Sam Yagin, the CEO of Match.com,  viewed a “showcase” Target store and was concerned that it looked just like other locations. He had instead expected advanced and personalized features such as “smart” shopping carts linked to shoppers’ mobile phones that would serve to make shopping more individualized. Casey Carl, the chief strategy and innovation officer at Target, agreed with his assessment.

3.  Medtronic PLC

This medical device manufacturer’s product includes insulin pumps for people with diabetes.5 They have been working with their digital advisory board, founded in 2011, to establish a “rapport” on social media with this community. One of the board’s members, Kay Madati, who was previously an executive at Facebook, recommended a more streamlined approach using a Facebook page. The goal was to build patient loyalty. Today, this FB page (clickable here), has more than 230,000 followers. Another initiative was launched to expand Medtronics’ public perception beyond being a medical device manufacturer.

This digital advisory board was suspended following the company’s acquisition and re-incorporation in Ireland. Nonetheless, an executive expects the advisory board to be revived within six months.

My questions are as follows:

  • Would it be advisable for a member of a digital advisory panel to also sit on another company’s panel, given that it would not be a competitor? Would both the individual and both corporations benefit by the possible cross-pollination of ideas from different markets?
  • What guidelines should be established for choosing members of such panels in terms of their qualifications and then vetting them for any possible business or legal conflicts?
  • What forms of ethical rules and guidelines should be imposed panel members? If so, who should draft,  approve, and then implement them?
  • What other industries, marketplaces, government agencies, schools and public movements might likewise benefit from their own digital advisory panels? Would established tech companies and/or startups likewise find benefits from them?
  • Might finding and recruiting members for a digital advisory panel be a new market segment for executive search firms?
  • What new entrepreneurial opportunities might emerge when and if digital advisory panels continue to grow in acceptance and popularity?

 


1.   All of which are covered in dozens of Subway Fold posts in their respective categories here, here and here.

2.  There are six recent Subway Fold posts in the category of Virtual and Augmented Reality.

3.  There are 21 recent Subway Fold posts in the category of Visualization.

4.   When I first read this, it made me think of Factory by Bruce Springsteen on his brilliant Darkness on the Edge of Town album.

5.   X-ref to the October 3, 2014 Subway Fold post entitled New Startups, Hacks and Conferences Focused Upon Health Data and Analytics concerning Project Night Scout involving a group of engineers working independently to provide additional mobile technology integration and support for people using insulin pumps.

Is Big Data Calling and Calculating the Tune in Today’s Global Music Market?

music-159870_1280-1The extraordinary degree to which big data apps and analytical services are now affecting the marketing, economics, talent development and the popularity of new tunes, has just been thoroughly and expertly explored in an article in the November 2014 issue of The Atlantic entitled The Shazam Effect, by Derek Thompson. This report covers this phenomenon across a multitude of musical genres and commercial venues. I highly recommend checking out this piece in its entirety for a true sense of this ongoing revolution in terms of the leading participants and the fascinating issues concerning business and creativity.

The following is my own summary, annotations and commentary upon just some of the key – – forgive me – – players, market data and open issues worth, well, noting.

I.  Today’s Key Music Business Data Players:

  • Shazam on its surface is an app that helps users to identify a particular song or melody. To date, it have been downloaded half a billion times and is searched 20 million times each day. It can identify emerging songs with breakout potential months in advance. While users enjoy its ability to readily identify a song, the music industry engage it as and early radar array. As well, it assists in identify unknown performers for talent scouts and agents.
  • Pandora and Spotify data sets are used by concert promoters and performers to shape touring venues and set lists. (X-ref to this August 14, 2014 Subway Fold post entitled Spotify Enhances Playlist Recommendations Processing with “Deep Learning” Technology.) One of Pandor’s executives, Eric Bieschke,  is quoted that his online service is not driven by a singular algorithm, but rather “a meta-algorithm that directs all of the other algorithms” to enable users to select songs and artists from the vast  troves of music across the Web.
  • Next Big Sound is a dedicated music analytics firm that gathers, blends and assesses relevant data streams from Spotify, Instagram and other online sources. In turn it sifts through this to identify 100 possible music stars to emerge during the next year. They are currently achieving a success rate of twenty percent. The company also offers a subscription based customizable search tool called “Find”  that will gather and assess selected data flows from Twitter, Facebook and other social platforms. They have found performers’ Wikipedia pages to be valuable predictors.
  • iHeartMedia (previously known as Clear Channel¹) uses Shazam to gauge the virality of new songs and Nielsen Audio deployment of tech called Portable People Meters to track individuals’ radio listening, (X-ref to this July 31, 2014 Subway Fold post about Nielsen’s data and analytics work entitled New Analytical Twitter Traffic Report on US TV Shows During the 2013 – 2014 Season.) HitPredictor, a subsidiary of iHeartRadio, accurately forecasts hits prior to their release by playing them for a large online test audience in order to solicit their feedback.
  • Billboard Top 100 (BT100) combines point-of-sales sales data, download music numbers and Nielsen’s listening metrics. One result is that songs remain on the BT100 longer. As a result of this “the relative value of a hot has exploded”. Thus, the top 1% of recording artists earn 77% of all recorded music sales, while the top 10 selling songs have increased their capture of the market by 82% during the last decade. This is indeed a market where the revenue rich continue to get richer revenues.

II. Current Market Influences and Trends:

  • Wisdom of the Crowds:  Before the advent of big data, music company execs largely relied on their own instincts in choosing artists and products to promote. Now with the advent of these sophisticated apps and services, they are relying on upon a group f principles known as the wisdom of the crowds². Very simply stated, large and diverse groups of people, such as the web-wide millions using these services, is more likely to make more accurate decisions and forecasts than smaller groups and/or experts in the relevant field(s).
  • The Long Tail Effect:  As noted above, there is an intense and very small concentration among artists for whom big data and analytics is producing economic rewards.³
  • Social Media:  Some, but not all to the same degree, of these platforms are now the major drivers in marketing new artists and their new music. They might even be more influential than the tradition of drawing audiences to live concerts.
  • Radio Airplay:  This mainstream media, while maintaining its ongoing relevance in the music business, likewise replies just as heavily on all of the social media and data analytics in order to “connect all these dots”. The Wisdom of the Crowds also plays an integral part of radio programming.*
  • Overproduction of Repetitive and Bland Music:  Music industry people whom Thompson approached for this article expressed concern that the data-driven nature of today’s market is producing a “clustering” of music in different genres and, in turn, noticeable levels of sameness and copycat acts. Nonetheless, he further writes that research shows that listeners very often seek out familiar music they have heard many times before.
  • Effects Upon Musical Artists: Notwithstanding the prior point, musicians and composers are aware of this phenomenon but generally have limited its effects upon their creative output. As well, some will add variations and imperfections to their live performances in order to keep them sounding fresh. (X-ref to this August 11, 2014 Subway Fold Post entitled The Spirit of Rock and Roll Lives on Little Steven’s Underground Garage about how, among other things, this is one of the basic tenets of  Garage Rock.)

III. Ongoing Issues:

  • At the very heart of all of this activity is, as precisely framed by Thompson “What do people want to hear next?”
  • While the music business is significantly benefiting from the accuracy of all of this data and calculation, is it likewise producing “better”, more diverse and imaginative music for audiences to consume?

My own additional questions include:

  • Despite the Long Tail effect, are artists is the much longer end of the curve still accruing some demonstrable benefits from big data insofar are being heard by larger audiences online and in concert?
  • Based upon the monumental amounts of past, present and future data about music and the music industry, could deep learning and other artificial intelligence (AI) methods be used to produce genuine hit songs in multiple genres, without any human intervention? Alternatively, is the human touch always needed in the musical arts? If the answer ever turns out to be “not always”, what are the implications?
  • Could analytics and AI produce a new genre of music that is not necessarily a hybrid? That is, are there sounds, rhythms, arrangements, styles, tablatures and so on that have not yet emerged and can be entirely machine synthesized?
  • The article mentions that Led Zeppelin’s iconic Stairway to Heaven was never played much after its initial release and that it never landed on the BT100. As an experiment to test the validity and accuracy of today’s music data apps and services, what would happen if many such great hit were retroactively tested? Would any be proven to be hits that never should have occurred according to today’s tech and, conversely, are there obscure songs from years ago that would produce results indicating they should have been hits? Could or even should, such results be used to further fine tune, if not develop new musical data methods and metrics?
  • What other new opportunities will arise, based on this merger or art and science, for entrepreneurs, artists, talent scouts and agents, established music companies, and concert halls?

December 19, 2014 Update: 

Adding to the big data strategies and implementations for three more major music companies and their rosters of artists was a very informative report in the December 15, 2014 edition of The Wall Street Journal by Hannah Karp entitled Music Business Plays to Big Data’s Beat. (A subscription for the full text required a subscription to WSJonline.com, but the story also appeared in full on Nasdaq.com clickable here.) As described in detail in this report, Universal Music, Warner Music, and Sony Music have all created sophisticated systems to parse numerous data sources and apply customized analytics for planning and executing marketing campaigns.

Next for an alternative and somewhat retro approach, a veteran music retailer named Sal Nunziato wrote a piece on the Op Ed page of The New York Times on the very same day entitled Elegy for the ‘Suits’. He blamed the Internet more than the music labels for the current state of music where “anyone with a computer, a kazoo and an untuned guitar” can release their music  online regardless of its quality. Thus, the ‘suits’ he nostalgically misses were the music company execs who exerted  more controlled upon the quantity and quality of music available to the public.

________________________

1Right Off the Dial  (Faber & Faber, 2009), by Alec Foege, chronicled the causes and effects of the company’s rapid rise in the commercial radio industry. I found this to be an eye-opening and very informative account of rapid consolidation within a specific sector of the mainstream media. I recommend it to anyone interested in this company and topic.

2.  For a well reviewed and highly readable treatise on this, I also very highly recommend The Wisdom of
the Crowds by James Surowiecki (Doubleday, 2004). Also here is a Wikipedia page summarizing some of the main points of the book.

3.  The definitive and superlative book on one of the most interesting outgrowths of online commerce is The Long Tail by Chris Anderson (Hyperion, 2006). Furthermore, I also highly recommend his incredibly diverse and entertaining show on NPR called Studio 360.

*  I still that think Bruce Springsteen’s take on the state of music radio in 2007, Radio Nowhere, deserves a click and listening here. Besides, it’s an exhilarating rocker.